Chat live with us

Environment

Environment

Illegal Dumping

I like the community I live in and I take pride in the community I live in.  Sound familiar, 99% of the community thinks this way too!  That’s why nobody likes illegal dumping.

Illegal dumping is a crime and it costs everyone.  The impacts of illegal dumping are felt throughout our community in a number of tangible ways, from a decrease in the amenity value of an area to the costs attributed for the clean-up of items that have been illegal dumped.  The money and time spent by Council, on behalf of its community, to respond to illegal dumping is money that could be better spent on beneficial improvements, for example, playground upgrades, that directly benefit our community.

How can I report illegal dumping?

What is council doing to tackle illegal dumping?

What is the cost to our community from illegal dumping?

What happens if I get caught illegally dumping?

How can I do the right thing?

What do I do with...

I need to get rid of stuff (furniture, house hold waste).  What do I do?

I’m moving out, what can I do with the furniture I no longer need?

What is the Local Nuisance and Litter Control Act, 2016 and how does this change the approach by Council to illegal dumping?

How can I report illegal dumping?

Making a complaint about illegally dumped rubbish is easy.  If you see illegally dumped waste, or if you see someone, or suspect something, report this to Council.  Complaints can be made to our Customer Contact Centre on 8408 1111 or email us at council@charlessturt.sa.gov.au.

The City of Charles Sturt keeps information reported by the public on a data base.  Information you provide may assist Council in developing a picture about a person, a place or types of waste.  Illegal dumping can be like a jigsaw puzzle that relies on continuous intelligence being collected to form a complete picture.  It is no different to any other crime.  We want your information, it is important to us and we do something with it.  It may assist Council in taking enforcement action, it may assist council in refining the type of educational information we publish, it may change the way in which we do something.  In short, your information is not lost, it is important and we use it to continually review our approach to illegal dumping.

Top

What is council doing to tackle illegal dumping?

The City of Charles Sturt introduced a program to tackle illegal dumping in 2013.  The integrated program incorporates the following components:

  • Education
  • Prevention
  • Enforcement
  • Evaluation
  • Advocacy

The program has been successful in reducing the number of illegal dumping incidents in our community by over 23% since its introduction, with an annual estimated cost savings of $25,000.

One of the key initiatives of the program is the response from Council where illegal dumping is reported.  Previously Council would receive a complaint and collect the items and dispose of them. This sent the wrong message to offenders.  What a cheap and convenient way to get rid of rubbish! 

The Illegal Dumping Strategy introduced ‘crime scene taping’ around items that have been illegally disposed on public land.  The crime scene tape sends a clear message that it is not acceptable to dump rubbish.  In addition, Council actively approaches surrounding houses to try to obtain information about how and who may have deposited the rubbish.  This process, together with education of our community, penalties for those who get caught illegally dumping, collaboration with other agencies including SA EPA, Housing SA and retail facilities, is helping to reduce the number of illegal dumping incidents throughout our community.

Top

What is the cost to our community from illegal dumping?

Managing illegal dumping costs big bucks!  In 2015 the City of Charles Sturt estimated that the cost of responding to illegal dumping was over $240,000.  This includes staff resources, vehicles, disposal costs, equipment and education costs.  Just think about how this money could be better spent in our community.

Top

What happens if I get caught illegally dumping?

If you inappropriately dispose of waste (illegal dumping) on public land within the City of Charles Sturt, chances are you will get caught and you could face a $315 on the spot fine or a $5,000 penalty.

Section 235 of the Local Government Act 1999 states:

(1) A person who, without the council's authorisation or permit—
     (a) deposits rubbish on a public road or public place; or
     (b) deposits goods, materials, earth, stone, gravel, or any other substance on a public road or public place,
i
s guilty of an offence.
Maximum penalty: $5 000.
Expiation fee: $315.

Top

How can I do the right thing?

99% of our community does the right thing.  It’s easy to manage your waste and avoid the embarrassment of being caught doing the wrong thing. 

Use your three bin system, that each house is allocated by Council, call Council to book in one of your free hard waste collection services (each household gets two free services per year), visit the Beverley Recycling and Waste Depot, search the Zero Waste SA Recycle Right search engine to find out how to recycle or manage particular items - http://www.zerowaste.sa.gov.au/at-home/recycle-right  or use the Household Hazardous Waste Depot: Cnr Magazine Road and Henschke Street, Dry Creek - http://www.zerowaste.sa.gov.au/at-home/hazardous-waste.

If you need further assistance, Customer Contact Centre on 8408 1111 or email us at council@charlessturt.sa.gov.au.

Top

What do I do with...

E–waste

Computers and TVs can be dropped off for free at Council’s Beverley Recycling and Waste Depot, located at 2-6 Toogood Avenue, Beverley. Phone 8408 1111. Open Monday to Saturday 8am to 4pm, Sunday 8am to 1pm (closed on Public Holidays).

For more information:

E-Waste Recycling (TVs & Computers)

Mattresses

Mattresses can be collected as part of hard waste or can be taken to the Beverly Recycling and Waste Centre, located at 2-6 Toogood  Avenue, Beverley.  Phone 8408 1111.  Open Monday to Saturday 8am to 4pm, Sunday 8am to 1pm (closed on Public Holidays)

Hazardous Waste (including liquids and chemicals)

If you have hazardous waste that you need to get rid of a free service is offered for households at the Household Hazardous Waste Depot: Cnr Magazine Road and Henschke Street, Dry Creek.  To find out more about opening hours and the types of waste that can be received at the Household Hazardous Waste Depot, log onto the website - http://www.zerowaste.sa.gov.au/at-home/hazardous-waste

Green organics

Every household is entitled to one 240L green organics bin which is collected on a fortnightly basis.  Additional green bins can be purchased by residents in accordance with the fees specified in the fees & charges register.   If you have accumulated a lot of green waste, it can be bundled and collected as part of a hard waste collection service, or it can be taken to the Beverley Recycling and Waste Centre or Welland Waste and Recycling Centre.

For more information:

Organics (green lid bin)

Top

I need to get rid of stuff (furniture, house hold waste).  What do I do?

Council offers a free hard waste service to all residents in the City of Charles Sturt.  Historically the hard waste service has been a fixed annual service, however the City of Charles Sturt is currently migrating to an at call hard waste service, where residents can phone in, up-to twice a year, to have hard waste collected from the kerbside at the front of their property.  Further information on hard waste collection can be found here:

Hard Waste

Alternatively, you can arrange for a skip bin to be delivered to your home by a private waste contractor which will be taken away by the waste company once you have finished cleaning up, or you can take your waste to any one of the facilities that operate in the City of Charles Sturt area:

Local Waste and Recycling Depots

Top

I’m moving out, what can I do with the furniture I no longer need?

Click here to book your at-call hard waste collection.

Alternatively you could take your items to the Beverley Recycling and Waste Centre, or another local waste and recycling depot. Click here for more information:

Local Waste and Recycling Depots

Top

What is the Local Nuisance and Litter Control Act, 2016 and how does this change the approach by Council to illegal dumping?

The introduction of the Local Nuisance and Litter Control Act, 2016 establishes expanded powers for Council in dealing with illegal dumping and nuisance complaints.  The legislation gives Council’s the power to operate on private land and waters, in addition to the existing power under S235 of the Local Government Act to operate on public land.

There are also expanded penalties for anyone caught littering or depositing of waste illegally.  The penalties range from a $210 on the spot fine, up-to $250,000 prosecution for a body corporate disposing of asbestos ($120,000 for individuals disposing of asbestos).

Top

Provide feedback for this page